martininamerica

tom-aiac:

piranhapunk:

image

Twenty-five years and three days later, reality takes a tip from fiction and charts “Weird Al” Yankovic’s new album Mandatory Fun at number one, with over 100,000 sales during it’s first week. In his 31 year long career, with 14 studio albums to his name, this is the first time he’s hit the top- and the first comedy album by ANY artist to hit #1 since 1960! Congratulations, Al! image

My sincerest congrats to my hero ^-^

fivetier

fivetier:

moshimoshijeffyboydesu:

moshimoshijeffyboydesu:

No, but seriously, never compare Frozen to NGE. NGE has a ridiculously well thought out and complex plot, believable characters that people like myself can identify with, and is considered to be one of the most influential animes ever created. Frozen on the other hand has a plot that is rushed and full of holes and is an obvious rushed job, even with the two main female characters being “relatable” to people on teh internetz.

Furthermore, NGE has produced 26 TV episodes, several of which had been reanimated an re-acted, two movies that compliment the TV series ( Death and Rebirth, End of Evangelion) and has 4 planned movies, three if which are done and tell a new story, an entire manga, and several chain stores dedicated to NGE in Japan. Frozen has nothing on NGE.

Regardless of your feelings on the series itself or anime in general, NGE is literally a genre-defining / genre-destructive / genre-revolutionizing piece of media with a very long, very distinct history within Japan.

Frozen is not even within the same ballpark of cultural relevance as NGE.

sugardollys
susiron:

themanfromnantucket:

biologizeable:

ktsaurusr3x:

gardenawayideas:

Help save the honey bees! Please reblog and share :)

I’m very skeptical about this. Last I’ve heard, CCD is caused by a combination of factors, and to blindly point a finger at one source without references just ticks my bullshit meter. Anyone got science to back this up?

I checked out this page on the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association website, and found a couple of recent papers on the subject (though, granted, they are against the use of neonicotinoid, so it might be a one-sided story). The general consensus seems to be (bee?) that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids cause changes in behavior and physiology which leads to colony collapse - immune suppression to make them more susceptible to disease, negative change in foraging behavior, abandonment of poisoned hives, etc - so, yes, it seems that it is a combination of factors, which are aggravated by pesticide poisoning.
Richard J Gill, Nigel E. Raine. Chronic impairment of bumblebee natural foraging behavious induced by sublethal pesticide exposure. Functional Ecology, British Ecological Society July 7, 2014 
Chensheng Lu, Kenneth M. Warchol, Richard A. Callahan Sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before proceeding to colony collapse disorder. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health. Bulletin of Insectology 2014
Dave Goulson An overview of the environmental risks posed by neonicotinoid pesticides. Journal of Applied Ecology 2013
Jeroen P VanderSluijs, Noa Simon-Delso, Dave Goulson, Laura Maxim, Jean-MarcBonmatin, Luc P. Belzunes Neonicotinoids, bee disorders and the sustainability of pollinator services Current Opinion Environmental Sustainability 2013
Rosemary Mason, Henk Tennekes, Francisco Sanchez-Bayo Immune Suppression by Neonicotinoid Insecticides at the Root of Global Wildlife Declines. Journal of Environmental Immunology. 2013

I’ve seen a bunch of “save the bees” post floating around tumblr, but this is the first one anyone bothered to put sources on.
Thank you. (However I’m not going to look at the sources now, but hopefully I will remember to do so later.)

Not to mention that stopping the use of these pesticides is one of the easiest things we could control— if people were willing. It’s hard to control parasites and internal issues that the bee faces, but it is not hard to stop spraying crops with harmful pesticides.

susiron:

themanfromnantucket:

biologizeable:

ktsaurusr3x:

gardenawayideas:

Help save the honey bees! Please reblog and share :)

I’m very skeptical about this. Last I’ve heard, CCD is caused by a combination of factors, and to blindly point a finger at one source without references just ticks my bullshit meter. Anyone got science to back this up?

I checked out this page on the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association website, and found a couple of recent papers on the subject (though, granted, they are against the use of neonicotinoid, so it might be a one-sided story). The general consensus seems to be (bee?) that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids cause changes in behavior and physiology which leads to colony collapse - immune suppression to make them more susceptible to disease, negative change in foraging behavior, abandonment of poisoned hives, etc - so, yes, it seems that it is a combination of factors, which are aggravated by pesticide poisoning.

Richard J Gill, Nigel E. Raine. Chronic impairment of bumblebee natural foraging behavious induced by sublethal pesticide exposure. Functional Ecology, British Ecological Society July 7, 2014 

Chensheng Lu, Kenneth M. Warchol, Richard A. Callahan Sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before proceeding to colony collapse disorder. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health. Bulletin of Insectology 2014

Dave Goulson An overview of the environmental risks posed by neonicotinoid pesticides. Journal of Applied Ecology 2013

Jeroen P VanderSluijs, Noa Simon-Delso, Dave Goulson, Laura Maxim, Jean-MarcBonmatin, Luc P. Belzunes Neonicotinoids, bee disorders and the sustainability of pollinator services Current Opinion Environmental Sustainability 2013

Rosemary Mason, Henk Tennekes, Francisco Sanchez-Bayo Immune Suppression by Neonicotinoid Insecticides at the Root of Global Wildlife Declines. Journal of Environmental Immunology. 2013

I’ve seen a bunch of “save the bees” post floating around tumblr, but this is the first one anyone bothered to put sources on.
Thank you. (However I’m not going to look at the sources now, but hopefully I will remember to do so later.)

Not to mention that stopping the use of these pesticides is one of the easiest things we could control— if people were willing. It’s hard to control parasites and internal issues that the bee faces, but it is not hard to stop spraying crops with harmful pesticides.